Collapse/Rebirth

Sculpture by Fujino Sachiko

April 26 – May 26, 2016

Fujino Sachiko (b. 1950)

Rensetsu ’15-11: Interconnection ’15-11

2015

Stoneware with matte glaze

16 7/8 x 22 1/2 x 18 1/2 in.

Inv# 9615

Fujino Sachiko (b. 1950)

Rensetsu '15-4; Interconnection ’15-4

2015

Stoneware with matte glaze

16 x 19 1/4 x 15 1/8 in.

Inv# 9606

Fujino Sachiko (b. 1950)

Rensetsu ’15-10: Interconnection ’15-10

2015

Stoneware with matte glaze

11 x 14 x 13 in.

Inv# 9614

Fujino Sachiko, Interconnection 15-3, 2015, stoneware with matte glaze, japanese contemporary ceramics

Fujino Sachiko (b. 1950)

Rensetsu ’15-3: Interconnection ’15-3

2015

Stoneware with matte glaze

13 7/8 x 19 x 8 1/8 in.

Inv# 9605

Fujino Sachiko (b. 1950)

Rensetsu ’15-9: Interconnection ’15-9

2015

Stoneware with matte glaze

11 1/4 x 14 x 11 1/4 in.

Inv# 9613

Press Release

COLLAPSE/REBIRTH: Sculpture by Fujino Sachiko and Futamura Yoshimi

April 26 – May 27, 2016

Joan B Mirviss LTD 39 East 78th Street NYC

 

An art inextricably linked to the five elements of earth, wind, wood, metal and fire, ceramics have been created as reflections of nature from their very beginning. As a testament to this fact, Joan B Mirviss LTD is pleased to announce the opening of the joint exhibition, Collapse/Rebirth: Sculpture by Fujino Sachiko and Futamura Yoshimi. For this show the two artists have each created a body of work that, while aesthetically different, complement each other in theme. Fujino’s smooth, layered forms evoke the beauty of a flower about to blossom, while the rough, cracked surfaces of Futamura’s sculptures suggest the hidden, mysterious side of nature. This juxtaposition reminds us of a balance that can only be governed by the natural world- a cycle in which collapse kindles rebirth.

FUJINO SACHIKO (b. 1950): Fujino’s artwork has a certain elegance unmistakably derived from her background in design. She began her career in textiles as a fashion designer in Kyoto. After taking a pottery class in the early 1980s, however, she developed a passion for the clay medium, leading her to study under the pioneering female ceramist, Tsuboi Asuka (b.1932). Since then, Fujino’s acclaim has only grown, as has her artistic style. Initially creating bold and powerful geometric forms, her most recent works have manifested into something more organic. For this exhibition, Fujino recalls childhood memories of a garden where flowers in full bloom competed with disorderly weeds. The artist believes:

“We see in nature an infinite number of relations that exist in delicate balance. There is a similarity between this balance with nature and the equilibrium necessary to create sculptural works. When I start my coil building process, the form is ever expanding and reveals itself to me through my manipulation of the clay.”

Without using maquettes and without the finished form in mind, Fujino relinquishes control to her coil-building technique. The struggle with her medium continues until the very end when Fujino finally discovers the completed sculpture. She uses an airbrush to dust her otherwise unadorned works with matte slip and sometimes adds a touch of colored glaze. The finished work seems to be on the brink of unfolding into full bloom just like the flowers from her childhood, revealing hidden layers of clay and life.

Fujino’s work has been highly awarded both nationally and internationally. Not only was her work represented in the renowned traveling exhibition, “Soaring Voices: Contemporary Japanese Women Ceramic Artists” from 2007 to 2012, but museums such as the Faenza International Ceramic Museum, Italy; Kyoto City Cultural Museum; Minneapolis Institute of Art, MN; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA; Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art, FL; and Yale University Art Gallery, CT to name a few, hold her artwork in their permanent collection.

For more information or to request high-resolution images, please call 212-799-4021 or email director@mirviss.com.