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Selected Works

Layered, rounded vessel with pooling blue-green crackled glass in center and torn sectional edges, 2014

Layered, rounded vessel with pooling blue-green crackled glass in center and torn sectional edges, 2014
Unglazed multi-fired porcelain with glass
5 1/2 x 18 1/2 x 15 3/8 in.
 

Torn, pointed oval-shaped vessel fragment with pooling of blue-green, translucent crackled glass, 2014

Torn, pointed oval-shaped vessel fragment with pooling of blue-green, translucent crackled glass, 2014
Unglazed multi-fired porcelain with glass
5 1/8 x 16 3/4 x 12 5/8 in.
 

Round teabowl with unctuous white glaze over feldspar-infused crackled clay body

Round teabowl with unctuous white glaze over feldspar-infused crackled clay body
2014
Glazed stoneware
4 x 6 x 5 3/8 in.
 

Horizontal, rock-shaped sculpture with applied translucent crystalized glass

Horizontal, rock-shaped sculpture with applied translucent crystalized glass
2014
7 7/8 x 14 3/4 x 11 5/8 in.
 

Rock-shaped sculpture with upturned ends in unglazed porcelain and adhered translucent crystalized glass

Rock-shaped sculpture with upturned ends in unglazed porcelain and adhered translucent crystalized glass
2014
Multi-fired unglazed porcelain with glass
7 x 13 3/8 x 10 in.
 

Round platter with scattered clear glass droplets and pinched rough rim

Round platter with scattered clear glass droplets and pinched rough rim
2014
Unglazed porcelain mixed with feldspar and silica and glass droplets
4 1/3 x 20 1/2 x 20 1/4 in.
 

Torn, triangular sculpture with pooling while translucent crackled glass

Torn, triangular sculpture with pooling while translucent crackled glass
2014
Unglazed multi-fired porcelain with glass
7 7/8 x 22 3/8 x 14 1/8 in.

Round teabowl with unctuous greenish-blue ash glaze over cracked clay feldspar-infused body

Round teabowl with unctuous greenish-blue ash glaze over cracked clay feldspar-infused body
2014
Glazed stoneware
3 3/4 x 5 1/2 x 5 1/2 in.

Torn, triangular sculpture with pooled and poured white translucent crackled glass

Torn, triangular sculpture with pooled and poured white translucent crackled glass
2014
Unglazed multi-fired porcelain with glass
6 3/4 x 19 3/4 x 13 3/4 in.

Press Release

press release 1

LUNAR FRAGMENTS: THE CERAMIC SCULPTURE OF OGAWA MACHIKO
November 13-December 19, 2014

New York.- Joan B Mirviss LTD, the leading gallery of modern and contemporary Japanese clay art, is honored to present Lunar Fragments, our second major solo exhibition of the arresting sculpture of Japan’s leading female clay sculptor, Ogawa Machiko. The first woman of her generation of ceramicists to achieve both artistic and critical success, Ogawa stands apart from her colleagues, male and female, as she has already been the focus of two major Japanese museum retrospectives.

 

press release 2

Her new body of work features exceptionally naturalistic boulder-like sculptures of unglazed porcelain with fused crystallizations of molten cracked glass glaze. These elemental yet strikingly modern pieces appear as if unearthed from a quarry and evoke both the crater-filled surface of the moon and sparkling celestial bodies, denying the nature of their complicated and painstaking creation. A longtime collector of rocks and minerals during her extensive international travels, Ogawa fittingly equates the joy she feels from her creative process to that of a miner, who after years of excavation, finally discovers a vein of ore.

press release 3

In another series, the artist’s forms suggest broken vessel fragments, deconstructed, as if unearthed on an archaeological dig having weathered the effects of the passage of time. These archetypal triangular bi-fold forms contain pools of glass glaze and appear as if literally torn from a large orb. Ogawa uses her highly honed technical abilities and an intellectual focus to mix numerous clays and glazes to achieve magical surface affects through multiple firings.  Feldspar, silica, and glass and metallic glazes are all used in the creation of not only her sculptural works but also her elegant teabowls and platters.

Ogawa insists on allowing the materials to guide her in the creative process. She embraces those works that other artists might consider failures, allowing her in the course of forming and shaping, to reveal the natural character of both the clay and the glaze.

Kazuo Amano, Chief Curator, Toyota Municipal Museum of Art and art critic

press release 4

Ogawa Machiko was the first woman admitted to the prestigious ceramic department at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts & Music; she further studied at the École d’Arts  et Métiers in Paris. While young and living in Burkina Faso in West Africa, she was able to learn and draw inspiration from the native workers who fired in the sunlight.

Among her numerous prizes, Ogawa is one of only six women to be awarded the prestigious Japan Ceramic Society Award since its inception is 1954. Her work was featured in two recent seminal US exhibitions: Touch Fire: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics by Women Artists in 2009 and Contemporary Clay: Japanese Ceramics for the New Century in 2007 and is in the permanent collection of major museums throughout the world including National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo; Museum of Modern Art, Kamakura; Suntory Museum of Art; and in the United States, Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Minneapolis Institute of Arts; and Yale University Art Gallery.

press release 5

Lunar Fragments will first be shown at Salon: Art + Design (November 13-17) and thereafter at Joan B. Mirviss LTD (November 24- December 19)

SALON ART + DESIGN
Park Avenue Armory (at 66th Street)
New York, NY
Friday & Saturday November 14  & 15   11 am - 9 pm
Sunday November 16    11 am – 7 pm
Monday November 17   11 am - 5 pm

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