Three Giants of the North: Kamoda Shôji, Matsui Kosei, Wada Morihiro

Asia Week New York 2018

March 12 – April 20, 2018

Kamoda Shōji

Vessel with blue enamel decoration against striped matte-black ground

1977

Glazed stoneware

12 1/4 x 9 1/2 x 7 in.

Inv# 10264

SOLD

Matsui Kōsei

Early and rare neriage vessel with sand-blasted surface

1973

Marbleized stoneware

16 1/2 x 11 1/4 x 10 3/4 in.

Inv# 10265

SOLD

 

Wada Morihiro

Hassanmonki

"Linear Cedar-patterned" vessel

1990

Slip-glazed stoneware

25 3/8 x 12 x 10 in.

Inv# 10364

SOLD

 

Wada Morihiro (1944-2008)

Kanmonki; Vessel with Abstract-Patterns-within-Rectangles Patterning

1990-1992

Slip-glazed stoneware

22 3/4 x 13 1/2 x 9"

SOLD

Matsui Kōsei (1927-2003)

Himalaya

1985

Marbleized stoneware

14 x 16 1/2"

Inv# 10180

SOLD

Kamoda Shōji (1933-1983)

Gray standing square unglazed vessel with blue & white striped enamel inlays set into curving bands and slightly lobed mouth

1977

Glazed stoneware with enamel inlay

17 x 5 1/2 x 5 3/4"

SOLD

Kamoda Shōji

Raised, footed platter with polychrome enamel curvilinear patterning

1977

Glazed stoneware

2 1/8 x 10 in.

Inv# 10288

SOLD

Wada Morihiro

Sōun kamonki 

"Misty Cloud-and-flower-patterned" vessel

1985

Slip-glazed stoneware

16 1/4 x 13 x 7 3/4 in.

Inv# 10363

 

Kamoda Shōji

Square dish with colorful leaf patterning

1972

Slip-glazed stoneware

1 3/8 x 6 1/8 x 6 in.

Inv# 10018

Matsui Kōsei

Ryūsui kōun

"Streaming River and Floating Clouds"

ca. 1986

Slip-glazed stoneware

3 1/8 x 20 3/4 in.

Inv# 10166

Kamoda Shōji

Columnar vase with impressed concentric semi-circular patterning

1955-1960

Ash-glazed stoneware

10 x 6 in.

SOLD

Kamoda Shōji

Small vessel with tri-color wave pattern

1978

Glazed stoneware

4 1/2 x 3/8 x 3 5/8 in.

Inv# 4896

Kamoda Shōji

Iron-glazed shallow bowl

ca. 1960

2 7/8 x 12 3/8 in.

Inv# 10038

SOLD

Kamoda Shōji

Square platter with feather-like decoration in blue and white against gray-black ground

1975

Glazed stoneware

1 x 13 1/4 x 13 in.

Inv# 10361

SOLD

Kamoda Shōji

Diamond-patterned rounded vase

1980

Glazed stoneware

6 1/4 x 4 in.

Inv# 10354

SOLD

Matsui Kōsei

Neriage mesh-patterned shallow teabowl

ca. 1973

Marbleized stoneware

1 7/8 x 6 1/2 in.

Inv# 10280

Matsui Kōsei

Neriage teabowl with clay-slip-paint on layered and fissured surface

ca. 1980

Slip-painted stoneware

3 1/8 x 5 1/8 x 5 in.

Inv# 9950

SOLD

Matsui Kōsei

Neriage brush-rubbed striped round vessel

1982

Marbleized stoneware

8 x 9 1/2 in.

Inv# 7687

SOLD

 

Matsui Kōsei

Square vessel with slip-painted blue and white patterning on textured surface

ca. 1982

Slip-painted stoneware

8 1/2 x 4 1/8 in.

Inv# 10239

SOLD

Matsui Kōsei

Gikai

"Turbulent Ocean;" neriage globular vessel

ca. 1985

Randomly marbleized stoneware

11 7/8 x 12 1/8 in.

Inv# 10003

SOLD

Matsui Kōsei

Neriage kamonko 

"Floral-patterned Marbleized Vessel"

1991

Marbleized stoneware

9 x 10 1/2 in.

SOLD

Wada Morihiro

Ryūsanmonki "Flowing cedar-patterned" vessel

ca. 1992

Slip-glazed stoneware

14 1/4 x 7 x 6 3/8 in.

Inv# 9296

Wada Morihiro

Yōmonki "Effigy-patterned" vessel

ca. 1992

Slip-glazed stoneware

7 x 9 1/2 x 8 in.

Inv# 10167

SOLD

Wada Morihiro

Saido sanmonki

"Color-slip Cedar-patterned" vessel

1979

Slip-glazed stoneware

14 3/8 x 13 1/8 x 6 1/4 in.

Inv# 8157

Wada Morihiro

Sanmonki

"Cedar-patterned Pyramidal" vessel

1981

Slip-glazed stoneware

9 x 6 3/4 x 7 1/2 in.

Inv# 9179

SOLD

 

Wada Morihiro

Taiyōmonsakabin shuhai

"Acanthus leaf-patterned Sake flask and Cup"

ca. 1996

Slip-glazed stoneware

Flask 5 3/8 x 3 5/8 in., cup 2 1/8 x 2 3/4 in.

Inv# 9956

SOLD

Wada Morihiro

Saido sanmonko

"Color-slip cedar-patterned" vessel

1981

Slip-painted stoneware

7 x 6 x 4 3/4 in.

Inv# 10001

SOLD

Wada Morihiro

Saji fūsōmonki 

"Wind-and-grass Patterned sand-treated" vessel

ca. 1982

Slip-glazed stoneware

8 1/2 x 14 1/4 x 6 in.

Inv# 10358

SOLD

Wada Morihiro

Saji fūsōmonki 

"Wind-and-grass-patterned Sand-treated" vessel

1983

Slip-glazed stoneware

14 7/8 x 11 7/8x 6 3/8 in.

Inv# 8806

SOLD

Wada Morihiro

Kakugenki kōro 

"Red-and-black-glazed Incense Burner"

ca. 1997

Slip-glazed stoneware

7 1/4 x 5 x 4 1/2 in.

Inv# 10077

SOLD

Wada Morihiro

Watashigaraki "I am lucky" vessel

ca. 2000

Unglazed Shigaraki stoneware

16 x 1/4 x 10 1/2 in.

Inv# 10627

SOLD

Wada Morihiro

Kakugen jōmonki "Red-black linear-patterned" vessel

ca. 2000

Slip-glazed stoneware

16 3/4 x 7 1/2 x 9 in.

SOLD

Wada Morihiro

Kifūmon shuhai 

"Fluttering Banners-patterned Sake Cup"

ca. 2006

Slip-glazed stoneware

3 1/4 x 3 x 2 1/4 in.

Inv# 10629

SOLD

Press Release

For more information on Asia Week New York, please click here.

 

NEW YORK - JOAN B. MIRVISS, LTD. is thrilled to present, after many years of planning, the important exhibition of 20th century ceramic superstars- Three Giants of the North: Kamoda Shôji, Matsui Kosei and Wada Morihiro. The exhibition focuses on three of Japan's most significant clay artists each of whom contributed to altering the style and aesthetic of ceramic history. This will be the first opportunity to see outside of Japan, a significant body of work by any of these three titans. Three Giants will open to the public on March 12th marking the start of Asia Week in New York City.

Long considered by many Japanese connoisseurs to be the greatest Japanese ceramic artist of the 20th century, Kamoda Shōji (1933-1983) was able to accomplish in half a life-time what other artists struggle to partially attain in double the time. In an unrivalled period of productivity from 1967-1978, Kamoda transformed the aesthetic appreciation of modern ceramics in Japan, awakening the entire conservative Japanese traditional ceramic world to a new vision of the concept of "function." Always nominally functional, his stoneware "vessels" are ever imaginative in form, line, balance, glazing and decorative adornment. Surface and form are created as a single thought, one complimenting the other. Nothing is overlooked from the delicacy of the mouth to the resolution of the base, both in perfect harmony, flaunting his sculptural approach to both form and surface decoration.

Born in Kishiwada Osaka, Kamoda studied under the hugely influential Tomimoto Kenkichi at Kyoto City University of Arts from which he graduated in 1952. By 1959, with substantial economic support, due in equal parts to his humble and generous spirit and to his monumental talent, he was able to establish his own kiln in Mshiko, far north of Tokyo. Ten years later he left his family to work further north in near isolation in Tono, Iwate.

"Walking into the North Wind" was a favorite phrase of Kamoda, who lived his short life of forty-nine years with such energy and has left the contemporary Japanese ceramic scene reverberating with the impact of his innovative works."

                    "The Ceramic Works of Kamoda Shoji" by Nakanodo Kazunobu in Kamoda Shoji: A Prominent Figure in Contemporary Ceramics, exhibition catalogue, Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, 1987.

 

To this day, long after Kamoda's premature death from leukemia at age forty-nine, ceramists continue to imitate and reinterpret his endlessly inventive forms and surface designs. His works can be found in the collections of prominent museums including the National Museums of Modern Art, Kyoto and Tokyo; Palace Museum, Beijing; and Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

Matsui Kōsei (1927-2003), was a siminal figure in the revival of neriage (marbleized colored clay) in the late twentieth century and his influence continues after his death. As a priest at the Gesso-ji Temple in Kasama Ibaraki Prefecture, Matsui studied ancient Chinese ceramics, allowing him to perfect and invent his own neriage techniques, consistently focusing on the manipulation of colored clays in the formulation of a ceramic vessel. Far surpassing these Chinese Tang and Cizhou historic predecessors, Matsui created highly original abstract, linear, floral and geometric surface patterns, often with a rough-hewn texture, using a variety of techniques perfected over the decades.

"Vibrantly colored layered clays are used to such an extent...that the conventional, narrow view of neriage has been shattered."

            (Hasebe Mitsuhiko, former curator of National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo)

"(Matsui's) works are imbued with an essentially human quality that interacts with the spiritual life, in a realm beyond that of everyday ceramics."

             (Kawakita Michiaki [quotes from The Works of Kosei Matsui 1985-1990)

 

His worldwide recognition for his success and creativity in this difficult but tradition-steeped process, culminated in his designation as a Living National Treasure in 1993. His work is now owned by many important museums including the Art Institute of Chicago; Brooklyn Museum of Art; Ibaragi Ceramic Art Museum; Metropolitan Museum of Art; National Museums of Modern Art, Tokyo Kyoto;  Victoria & Albert Museum.

Wada Morihiro (1944-2008), born in Mishinomiya, Kansai, graduated from Kyoto City University of Arts where he studied under Tomimoto Kenkichi and others. Like Kamoda before him, Wada decided to relocate from Kyoto to north of Tokyo into the ceramic town of Kasama. This dramatic move enabled him to break free of the more classical aesthetics of Kyoto and develop his own highly distinctive repertoire of motifs and techniques that were more closely aligned to the work of Kamoda.

Wada wrote, "the various vessels that I create depart from me as dramas with their own characters and roles." To accomplish this, he created numerous surface patterns, some abstract and geometric, others more curvilinear and organic, using a highly unique repertoire of techniques that include wax reisist and engraving. For all his sculptural forms, Wada painstakingly worked the exteriors through the application of colored-clay slips, after which he scrapped, incised, burnished, and textured the surface until he achieved his desired outcome.

For several decades, Wada was the most respected Japanese artist working with polychrome decorated surfaces and his sudden death in 2008 left an enormous hole in the world of contemporary ceramics. Like Matsui and Kamoda, Wada's works have been widely exhibited outside of Japan and are found in museum collections including Faenza International Museum of Ceramics, Italy; Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY; Musèe National de cèramique Sèvres, France; and Victoria & Albert Museum, London.

 

About JOAN B MIRVISS LTD

Joan B. Mirviss has been a distinguished expert in Japanese art specializing in prints, paintings, screens and ceramics for forty years. She is the leading Western dealer in the field of modern and contemporary Japanese ceramics, and from her New York gallery on Madison Avenue, JOAN B MIRVISS LTD exclusively represents most of today's top Japanese clay artists. As a distinguished, widely published, and highly respected specialist in her field, Mirviss has advised and built collections for many museums, major private collectors, and corporations.

 

For further information or images, please call 212-799-4021 or email admin@mirviss.com

More Info

The official website for Asia Week New York 2018 is now available to view by clicking here.

Please click the link below to view the exhibition catalogue. Fullscreen mode can be accessed by clicking the square in the bottom right.